TK/BC Labels Initiative

The Traditional Knowledge & BioCultural Labels Initiative

The TK and BC Labels were developed by Dr. Jane Anderson and Māui Hudson, who recently presented a Divseek webinar in July 2021.

To register for the Local Contexts Hub, click here.

 
What is Local Contexts (localcontexts.org)?

Local Contexts is a web-based platform that supports Indigenous communities in managing intellectual and cultural property rights in cultural heritage, environmental data and genetic resources within digital environments. Local Contexts recognizes the inherent sovereignty that Indigenous communities have over knowledge and data that comes from their lands, territories and waters.

 
What are Traditional Knowledge (TK) Labels? 

The TK Labels are digital markers that establish proper attribution, access, and use rights for traditional knowledge. The TK Labels are designed to be customized by Indigenous communities to reflect ongoing relationships and authority including proper use, guidelines for action or responsible stewardship and re-use of traditional knowledge.

 
What are Biocultural (BC) Labels?

The BC Labels are digital markers that focus on accurate provenance, transparency and integrity in research engagements around Indigenous data. The BC Labels help Indigenous communities define community expectations and consent about appropriate use of collections and data. They connect data to people and environments over time.

 

What are TK and BC Notices ?

Notices are specific tools for institutions and researchers which support the recognition of Indigenous interests in collections and data.  There are four Notices: the TK (Traditional Knowledge) Notice and the BC (Biocultural) Notice align to the TK and BC Labels.  There are two CI (Cultural Institution) Notices; the Attribution Incomplete Notice and the Open to Collaboration Notice. The latter may be of immediate interest to Plant Genetic Resource managers and users.

The TK/BC Label System contributes to enhancing F.A.I.R. principles for data exchange, and the C.A.R.E. principles for Indigenous Data Governance